The Leafie invasion of Adelaide

A French group, Le Phun, created a hundred of these sculptures for WOMADelaide.

“The innovative theatre company from Toulouse combines the reality of the everyday with the creative world of the imagination. Their beguiling, ephemeral Leafies (Les Pheuillus) – plant sculptures born from autumn leaves, in human form – will appear and migrate to unexpected places in Botanic Park during the festival, as a reflection on the poetic aspects of nature.”

I didn’t make it to WOMADelaide this year, but soon discovered that the leafies had escaped the Botanic Park and started to show up in unexpected places around the city of Adelaide. 

I was startled to see a strange figure at the base of the staircase to the tea rooms in the Adelaide Arcade.… Read the rest

Ecocide — Criminal, not Civil

In part two of my 2014 interview with Polly Higgins, we start by talking bout why ecocide should be a criminal, rather than civil matter.

Books:
Eradicating Ecocide: Laws and Governance to Prevent the Destruction of our Planet 
www.eradicatingecocide.com/books
Earth is our Business: Changing the Rules of the Game
— www.earthisourbusiness.com

See Ecocide Act: http://eradicatingecocide.com/overview/ecocide-act/

Sadly, Polly Higgins died of an aggressive cancer over Easter this year, a couple of months after the diagnosis.… Read the rest

Ecocide — why isn’t it a Crime Against Peace?

Polly Higgins was a Scottish barrister, who left her career as a corporate lawyer to focus on environmental advocacy, and unsuccessfully lobbied the United Nations Law Commission to recognise ecocide as an international crime.

Ecocide had been proposed as one of the international crimes against peace in 1996, but failed to be included in the final Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Higgins started to campaign for its inclusion around 2009, when the Rome statue was being reviewed.… Read the rest

Phantasmagoria

On the 150th Anniversary of one of Lewis Carroll’s lesser known works.

Phantasmagoria is Lewis Carroll’s longest poem, weighing in at 140 verses with five lines per verse, as opposed to The Hunting of the Snark, which has one more verse but in which each verse consists only of four lines. All things considered, I prefer the Snark, but Phantasmagoria has its own charms.… Read the rest