Issue 6, Dec 2019 Now Available!

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Yay! The new issue of Wild Goose is out! As some of you might have guessed from this image, the main article is Paul Downton’s slide presentation of a recent visit to Barcelona.

Australian architect, writer, artist and urban evolutionary, Paul has been called a ‘father of the ecocity movement’ and sees ecocities as an evolutionary adventure. His best known built project is Christie Walk, in Adelaide (where Roman lives in a straw-bale house).Read the rest

The Watchmen Sequel

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I was a big fan of the original Watchmen 
comic series, which dealt with Thatcher and Nuclear War, and enjoyed the movie which focussed on Reagan and genetech. How, I wondered, would it fare as a TV series?

This HBO TV series is surprising, in that it has a strong focus on race relations in the US — remember that the original was british oriented — and appears to follow on from the original Watchmen story, some decades later.… Read the rest

His Dark Materials

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One of the delights 
in recent TV watching is the new HBO/BBC production of His Dark Materials, based on the wonderful trilogy from Philip Pullman.

Unlike the 2007 film of The Golden Compass, the TV series doesn’t sanitise the evil of the Magisterium, a religious organisation which rules Lyra’s world. The film suggested that the evil was a military fascism with religious overtones, rather than being a key characteristic of strict authoritarian religions.… Read the rest

Gaudi & Barcelona

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If you’re in Barcelona, and have an interest in architecture, then you’ll be hunting down the Gaudi buildings.
Paul Downton, Architect and director of Ecopolis did exactly that. We invited him to share some thoughts (and slides) with us.

 

Australian architect, writer, artist and urban evolutionary, Paul has been called a ‘father of the ecocity movement’ and sees ecocities as an evolutionary adventure.Read the rest

What’s in Issue 5 of The Wild Goose

 

Adelaide’s been invaded by strange critters called “Leafies”, as detailed by Roman

We hear about Ecocide as a crime against peace from Polly Higgins.

Ian Borchardt gives us the info on Jane Austen, Private Eye.

Marc Ortlieb introduces us to Lewis Carrol’s Phantasmagoria.

Adam reveals his shameful obsession, and also talks about building robots.

We have a look at some recent novellae, and Tony Thomas treats us to
The Denier’s Nightmare

Don’t miss out!

Read the rest

Did you enjoy issue 4? Or did it annoy you?

We’re just putting the finishing touches on the new issue, so there’s still time to comment on issue 4
(http://wild-goose.net/issue/issue4/), the Gibbons on the Ramparts issue. 

If you enjoyed Ladies in Black, you might want to catch Top End Wedding — a lovely, unpredictable rom-com with spectacular scenery and delightful characters.

Adam talked about the AI problem (and I note Murderbot #2 took out the Hugo for novella), I reminisced about visiting St Petersburg, and Christine Pyman shared her opinion of the new Dr Who.… Read the rest

Pokémon vs Potter

Adam looks at two similar games to consider why one succeeds, and the other doesn’t.

I have relatively little shame in admitting that I’m a Pokémon Go player. I will admit that I do have some shame, but it is manageable. I started playing back when the game was new, exciting, and popular, and kept playing as everyone else I knew slowly dropped away, leaving just a small group of serious players who refuse to move on.… Read the rest

RoboRoos 2019

One of the interesting things Adam does in his “spare” time is to build robots.

After taking a year off, in 2019 I returned to mentoring the local student robotics team, the RoboRoos. I enjoyed my break but I admit to missing the team, and even though difficult years can be more than a tad frustrating, when things are working there is little that I enjoy more.… Read the rest

Novellas (novellae?) are in

There was an interesting discussion between Jonathan Strahan and Gary Wolfe a while back on the Coode Street Podcast about the attractions of the novella form: long enough to allow some interesting world-building and development, but not as major a commitment as a novel. With Tor (in particular) publishing a number of novellas, there’s a market for the stories. Unsurprisingly, authors have risen to the challenge.… Read the rest

The Denier’s Nightmare

Acknowledgement: The first line was seen on a placard on the climate change march in
Melbourne, Sunday 21 September 2014, which inspired the rest.

 

The Denier’s Nightmare
by Tony Thomas

I love a sun-powered country

Whose roofs are turning green,

Where trees have done for coal stacks

And cars are seldom seen.… Read the rest

Heard on the Grapevine…

Tony Thomas sends us his thoughts on some articles in recent issues of Wild Goose

Red Sparrow reviewed by Roman: I read the novel about the same time as you and had similar reactions.
Although considerably bloodier than novels by Stella Rimington (former head of MI5), you’ve got to believe the spycraft in both her books and Red Sparrow because they’re written by people who supposedly have lived these lives.… Read the rest

The Leafie invasion of Adelaide

A French group, Le Phun, created a hundred of these sculptures for WOMADelaide.

“The innovative theatre company from Toulouse combines the reality of the everyday with the creative world of the imagination. Their beguiling, ephemeral Leafies (Les Pheuillus) – plant sculptures born from autumn leaves, in human form – will appear and migrate to unexpected places in Botanic Park during the festival, as a reflection on the poetic aspects of nature.”

Read the rest